Học bổng Mitacs Global link

Cơ hội sang Canada thực tập hè theo chương trình học bổng Mitacs Global link. Đây là chương trình cung cấp học bổng cho sinh viên một số nước (trong đó có Việt Nam) sang thực tập nghiên cứu trong vòng 12 tuần hè tại một số trường đại học tại Canada. Chi phí đi lại, sinh hoạt, ăn uống được chương trình cung cấp trọn gói.
Điều kiện apply học bổng này đối với sinh viên Việt Nam gồm:
– Là sinh viên đại học chuẩn bị bước lên năm thứ 3 (đối với các trường đào tạo 4 năm) hoặc năm thứ 4 (đối với trường đào tạo 5 năm).
– Điểm trung bình trên 8.0
– Thông thạo tiếng Anh hoặc Pháp
Thông tin chi tiết về chương trình Mitacs Global link được đăng tại website:
Hạn nộp hồ sơ: trước 24/9/2015
Nếu được nhận học bổng, sinh viên sẽ sang thực tập tại Canada hè năm 2016. Sau thực tập, sinh viên có cơ hội được học bổng của Mitacs để theo học cao học và tiến sĩ tại Canada. Xin lưu ý là học bổng sau đại học của Mitacs chỉ dành cho những ai đã từng tham gia chương trình thực tập hè. Do vậy chương trình thực tập hè là bước đệm quan trọng cho những bạn sinh viên muốn học lên cao học và tiến sĩ sau khi tốt nghiệp.
Thông tin dành cho các bạn sinh viên ngành hóa/hóa công nghệ/ khoa học môi trường/công nghệ môi trường: kỳ thực tập hè 2016 tôi (thầy Tuấn Anh, đang dạy tại Canada) dự định nhận 2 sinh viên sang tham gia vào 2 đề tài liên quan đến hóa môi trường (thông tin về 2 đề tài này xin tham khảo ở cuối thư này). Mặc dù Mitacs sẽ quyết định ai thực tập dưới sự hướng dẫn của tôi (nghĩa là thực tập viên làm với tôi không nhất thiết phải là sinh viên Việt Nam), nếu bạn nào quan tâm và muốn nộp hồ sơ thì có thể liên lạc trực tiếp với tôi để tìm hiểu thêm về các dự án này cũng như cách nộp hồ sơ.
Các bạn sinh viên quan tâm có thể liên hệ với thầy Tuấn Anh: a.pham@carleton.ca
Anh Pham, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Carleton University
2368 MacKenzie Building
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada, K1S 5B6
Phone:613-520-2600, ext. 2984
http://carleton.ca/cee/people/pham-anh/
http://anhphamcarleton.weebly.com/
Project 1: Removal of organic contaminants in oil sands process water by electrochemical oxidation

The extraction of bitumen from oil sands in Alberta (Canada) utilizes large volumes of freshwater, and generates wastewater, known as oil sands process water (OSPW). OSPW is comprised of a complex mixture of bitumen residue, dissolved organic compounds, inorganic salts, and suspended solids. Under the current practice, approximately 70% of the OSPW is treated for reuse, while the other 30% is discharged and stored in tailing ponds. However, the use of tailing ponds for the storage of OSPW recently has received significant questions because many of the compounds in OSPW are toxic to aquatic habitats. In particular, there have been concerns that accidental release of OSPW from the ponds can contaminate surface water and groundwater. Therefore, water treatment technologies that could improve OSPW water quality and reduce its toxicity have the potential to decrease the environmental impacts of the oil sands industry by enhancing water reuse, reducing tailing ponds size, and preventing environmental pollution risks.

This 12-week long summer project will examine the use of electrochemical oxidation processes for the treatment of OSPW. In an electrochemical oxidation process, organic contaminants are removed by oxidation when electric current is applied to the anode (i.e., one of the 2 electrodes in the electrochemical reactor). Under the supervision of the professor, the student will conduct experiments in the environmental laboratory at Carleton University to select the materials that can serve as anode, optimize the design of the reactor, and evaluate the OSPW treatment efficiency. The overall goal of this research is to assess whether electrochemical oxidation could be developed into an effective, cost-competitive treatment technology for removing contaminants in OSPW. In addition, the goal of the project is also to give the student opportunities to learn how to operate modern analytical instruments, and to interact with Master and PhD students in our program.

Project 2: Use of persulfate as an oxidant for remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil

After 20 years of investment in remediation efforts, Canada still has over 22,000 federal hazardous sites where contaminated groundwater and soil pose threats to public health. If we were to use existing technologies, such as groundwater extraction and bioremediation, to remediate these sites, approximately $4.9 billion will be needed for the cleanup in the coming decades. New technologies that improve the efficiency of site cleanup have the potential to save money and speed the time required for site remediation.

This 12-week long summer project will examine the use of persulfate for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In situ remediation using persulfate, also known as in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO), involves the injection of sodium persulfate solutions into the subsurface. Upon contact with iron-containing minerals, persulfate is converted into sulfate and hydroxyl radicals, i.e., highly reactive oxidants that can oxidize a wide range of organic contaminants. The technology is simple, easy to deploy, but its use is often limited because we currently lack the basic understanding about environmental factors that may affect persulfate chemistry and contaminant oxidation. Under the supervision of the professor, the student will conduct experiments in the environmental laboratory at Carleton University to fulfill some of the knowledge gaps related to the persulfate ISCO technology. The goal of the project is also to give the student opportunities to learn how to operate modern analytical instruments, and to interact with Master and PhD students in our program.